DIY Cardboard Camera Mk2

After some success with the first cardboard box camera, and wanting to produce some large format (10×8 inch) images, I set about designing and building a new camera which could focus the image without being moved. This has the great advantage of being able to adjust the size an object appears in the image and still be in focus.

To achieve the variable focus I produced a box in two parts so that one slid inside the the other and joined them together, in a light-tight fashion, with a piece of black polythene bin liner. This give a light-tight but flexible join. I used the same film holder from the first camera with some improvements to make it more light tight. I added a channel to the new camera within which the film carrier could slide, using a strip of black paper to provide a flexible, light tight seal between the carrier and the box camera. The carrier is inserted in the top of the box.

As usual here, I am using Ilford glossy photo paper – at ISO6 and pre-flashing it to decrease contrast.

Utilising a spare vintage lens I ran a few test strips because even though the lens has marked F-stops, the distance between the lens and the film also affects light intensity. After running the tests I made the first 10×8 image (F22 2s exposure). This was in intense bright sunlight – not the best for a good tonal range – but it did really test the light-tightness of the camera. Here is an iphone shot of the negative a digitally produced invert to create the positive image. Once the negative is dry, I’ll take a high resolution photograph of it.

This works! – I am getting the tonal range and soft-dreamy look I am after – for a lot less money than the £800 10×8 antique camera on Ebay I’ve been considering.

Next step is to wait for a softer light and make some more images.